Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Hello,
        Male victims of domestic violence can and are frequently victims of abuse in the home, either at the hands of their female or, in the case of same-sex relationships, their male partner. Abuse is a control issue - abusers believe they have the right to manipulate, control and humilate another person, and this belief is not only held by some men but also by some women.

This page is not questioning statistics, or asking whether more male vicitms of domestic violence than women victims or vice versa. At the end of the day the question is almost inconsequential. We know that there are many men who DO experience Domestic Abuse at some stage in their lives, and whether there are 1000 or 100,000 per year in the UK alone doesn't make any difference to the individual suffering and fear and pain experienced by any one man in an abusive relationship. What is important, is that their suffering is taken seriously, and that support and help is available when needed, regardless of gender.

Many of the effects of abuse for the male victim of domestic violence are the same as for women. They are likely to feel deeply shamed, frightened, experience a loss of self-worth and confidence, feel isolated, guilty and confused about the situation.
Thanks,

I didn't find the right solution from the internet.

http://www.hiddenhurt.co.uk/male_victims_of_domestic_violence.html

Professional  Whiteboard Video Pricing
2
Men and Domestic Violence / Domestic Violence
Last post by davidhill - Mar 22, 2017, 07:36 AM
Hello,

             Domestic violence is abuse between two adults who share the same household (which usually sums up to romantic partners, but can mean adult children abusing their elderly parents, siblings, etc). Criminal (prosecutable) domestic violence may include physical assault (slapping, hitting, pushing, shoving, etc), sexual assault/rape, stalking/harassment, or blackmail. Non-criminal domestic violence may include emotional abuse (intimidation, mind-games, etc), or financial/economic abuse (i.e. controlling money). These latter forms eventually turn into criminal behaviors in 80% of cases.
Thanks,

I didn't find the right solution from the internet.

http://www.fortrefuge.com/domestic.html

Professional Whiteboard Video Cost
3
Hello,

     If you're looking to connect with people through chat rooms and message boards that are focused on domestic violence and sexual assault, this list of online resources will help. If you join an online conversation, please keep in mind that you should not use your real name or contact information, and only use a safe email address if one is required. You never know who else may see your posts. Also be sure to practice Safe Surfing, so that your online activity stays confidential.
Thanks,

I didn't find the right solution from the internet.

https://www.domesticshelters.org/online-forums-and-chats

Professional  Landing Page Video Pricing
4
 Hello,
               The Children's Aid Society believes that when there is violence in the home, every member of the family is affected. That's why the Family Wellness Program addresses domestic violence from the perspective of the entire family.

A wide range of services is available for those who have experienced violence in their homes or in dating relationships. They include:

Individual counseling for survivors of abuse, and children and teens who have witnessed abuse.
Family counseling for children and their non-abusive parents.
Group counseling for women, children and teens.
Men's groups for men who have used abusive behavior in intimate relationships.
Case management and advocacy services, including help acquiring public assistance, orders of protection, housing and shelter as well as referrals for other services when necessary.
Services are provided free-of-cost in English and Spanish at several locations in Manhattan and the Bronx.
Thanks,

I didn't find the right solution from the internet.

http://www.childrensaidsociety.org/family-support/domestic-violence-prevention-intervention-services?%21acq%21v2%21s-b-114129712241-1762173521&utm_campaign=Domestic+Violence&gclid=CjwKEAjwwcjGBRDj-P7TwcinyBkSJADymblTBdpHIkrLHiaKYQPrp7njQjvB_99iEGtFQd9va-e-_BoCyLTw_wcB


Professional Landing Page Video Cost
5
Recognize domestic violence against men

Domestic violence -- also known as intimate partner violence -- occurs between people in an intimate relationship. Domestic violence against men can take many forms, including emotional, sexual and physical abuse and threats of abuse. It can happen in heterosexual or same-sex relationships.

Abusive relationships always involve an imbalance of power and control. An abuser uses intimidating, hurtful words and behaviors to control his or her partner.

It might not be easy to recognize domestic violence against men. Early in the relationship, your partner might seem attentive, generous and protective in ways that later turn out to be controlling and frightening. Initially, the abuse might appear as isolated incidents. Your partner might apologize and promise not to abuse you again.

You might be experiencing domestic violence if your partner:

Calls you names, insults you or puts you down
Prevents you from going to work or school
Stops you from seeing family members or friends
Tries to control how you spend money, where you go or what you wear
Acts jealous or possessive or constantly accuses you of being unfaithful
Gets angry when drinking alcohol or using drugs
Threatens you with violence or a weapon
Hits, kicks, shoves, slaps, chokes or otherwise hurts you, your children or your pets
Forces you to have sex or engage in sexual acts against your will
Blames you for his or her violent behavior or tells you that you deserve it





About Me:
I'm new in this forum, I am a consultant and have worked with multiple firms
You can check Product Video Pricing one of my work.
6
About two in five of all victims of domestic violence are men, contradicting the widespread impression that it is almost always women who are left battered and bruised, a new report claims.

Men assaulted by their partners are often ignored by police, see their attacker go free and have far fewer refuges to flee to than womenData from Home Office statistical bulletins and the British Crime Survey show that men made up about 40% of domestic violence victims each year between 2004-05 and 2008-09, the last year for which figures are available. In 2006-07 men made up 43.4% of all those who had suffered partner abuse in the previous year, which rose to 45.5% in 2007-08 but fell to 37.7% in 2008-09.

Similar or slightly larger numbers of men were subjected to severe force in an incident with their partner, according to the same documents. The figure stood at 48.6% in 2006-07, 48.3% the next year and 37.5% in 2008-09, Home Office statistics show.

The 2008-09 bulletin states: "More than one in four women (28%) and around one in six men (16%) had experienced domestic abuse since the age of 16. These figures are equivalent to an estimated 4.5 million female victims of domestic abuse and 2.6 million male victims."

In addition, "6% of women and 4% of men reported having experienced domestic abuse in the past year, equivalent to an estimated one million female victims of domestic abuse and 600,000 male victims".Campaigners claim that men are often treated as "second-class victims" and that many police forces and councils do not take them seriously. "Male victims are almost invisible to the authorities such as the police, who rarely can be prevailed upon to take the man's side," said John Mays of Parity. "Their plight is largely overlooked by the media, in official reports and in government policy, for example in the provision of refuge places - 7,500 for females in England and Wales but only 60 for men."



For more you can check Motion Graphic Video Cost
7
Activism / Why men don't leave
Last post by johnwalker - Mar 18, 2017, 03:39 AM
Many people have trouble understanding why a woman who is being abused by her husband or boyfriend doesn't simply just leave him. When the roles are reversed, and the man is the victim of the abuse, people are even more bemused. However, anyone who's been in an abusive relationship knows that it's never that simple. Ending a relationship, even an abusive one, is rarely easy.Domestic violence and abuse can have a serious physical and psychological impact on both you and your children. The first step to stopping the abuse is to reach out. Talk to a friend, family member, or someone else you trust, or call a domestic violence helpline.

Admitting the problem and seeking help doesn't mean you have failed as a man or as a husband. You are not to blame, and you are not weak. As well as offering a sense of relief and providing some much needed support, sharing details of your abuse can also be the first step in building a case against your abuser and protecting your kids.





About Me:
I'm new in this forum, I am a consultant and have worked with multiple firms
You can check App Video Cost one of my work.
8
Activism / Help for Men Who Are Being Abu...
Last post by johnwalker - Mar 18, 2017, 03:35 AM
While the majority of domestic violence victims are women, abuse of men happens far more often than you'd probably expect. Typically, men are physically stronger than women but that doesn't necessarily make it easier to escape the violence or the relationship. An abused man faces a shortage of resources, skepticism from police, and major legal obstacles, especially when it comes to gaining custody of his children from an abusive mother. No matter your age, occupation, or sexual orientation, though, you can overcome these challenges and escape the abuse.



If you need help, reach out using the phone numbers listed immediately below and in the references at the end of this article
Recognize that abuse of men is not uncommon
Learn more about why men don't leave
Understand what you can do to build your case for abuse
Learn more by reading the related articles




About Me:
I'm new in this forum, I am a consultant and have worked with multiple firms
You can check Product Video Cost one of my work.
9
Activism / Why may it be difficult for me...
Last post by thomasmiller - Mar 18, 2017, 03:29 AM
If you're a man in an abusive relationship, it's important to know that you're not alone. It happens to men from all cultures and all walks of life. Figures suggest that as many as one in three victims of domestic violence are male. However, men are often reluctant to report abuse by women because they feel embarrassed, or they fear they won't be believed, or worse, that police will assume that since they're male they are the perpetrator of the violence and not the victim.

An abusive wife or partner may hit, kick, bite, punch, spit, throw things, or destroy your possessions. To make up for any difference in strength, she may attack you while you're asleep or otherwise catch you by surprise. She may also use a weapon, such as a gun or knife, or strike you with an object, abuse or threaten your children, or harm your pets. Of course, domestic abuse is not limited to violence. Your spouse or partner may also:

Verbally abuse you, belittle you, or humiliate you in front of friends, colleagues, or family, or on social media sites.
Be possessive, act jealous, or harass you with accusations of being unfaithful.
Take away your car keys or medications, try to control where you go and who you see.
Try to control how you spend money or deliberately default on joint financial obligations.
Make false allegations about you to your friends, employer, or the police, or find other ways to manipulate and isolate you.
Threaten to leave you and prevent you from seeing your kids if you report the abuse.




About Me:
I'm new in this forum, I am a consultant and have worked with multiple firms
You can check Video Making Costone of my work.
10
Men's Stories / Male Victims of Domestic Viole...
Last post by thomasmiller - Mar 18, 2017, 03:26 AM
Male victims of domestic violence can and are frequently victims of abuse in the home, either at the hands of their female or, in the case of same-sex relationships, their male partner. Abuse is a control issue - abusers believe they have the right to manipulate, control and humilate another person, and this belief is not only held by some men but also by some women.

This page is not questioning statistics, or asking whether more male vicitms of domestic violence than women victims or vice versa. At the end of the day the question is almost inconsequential. We know that there are many men who DO experience Domestic Abuse at some stage in their lives, and whether there are 1000 or 100,000 per year in the UK alone doesn't make any difference to the individual suffering and fear and pain experienced by any one man in an abusive relationship. What is important, is that their suffering is taken seriously, and that support and help is available when needed, regardless of gender.

Many of the effects of abuse for the male victim of domestic violence are the same as for women. They are likely to feel deeply shamed, frightened, experience a loss of self-worth and confidence, feel isolated, guilty and confused about the situation.

"At first, she discouraged me from seeing old friends, especially female friends. She threatened to use violence against them. For example "If so and so visits here, I'll be putting a knife in her guts." ... She would flirt with my friends, but then tell me that they were trying to seduce her behind my back. This left me feeling distrustful of my friends. Later on, I found out that she had been telling them that they shouldn't come round because I was insanely jealous. All this had the effect of damaging my social network." (Thomas)A lot of male victims of abuse however, have great difficulty defining it as such. This is partially due to the image our western society generally has of Man. Men are often thought of as strong, domineering and macho. Boys, even at a young age, are taught that it is unmanly to cry ("big boys don't cry"). To many, the idea of a grown man being frightened or vulnerable is a taboo, the idea of a man - usually physically the stronger - of being battered, ludicrous. Hence many male victims of abuse may feel "less of a man" for suffering abuse, feel as though they are in some way not manly enough and ought to have the ability to prevent the abuse.


For more you can check Video Making Cost
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10